Citation Issues

Citing Unrecorded Interviews

Over the years, my parents and other relatives have told me things about my family that they were eyewitnesses to or involved in. I know typically, you'd cite another person's knowledge as an interview, but these conversations were informal and no notes were ever taken. I just "know" the information because I've heard the stories several times.

Citation for item found on Jisc Archive Hub

I need help in writing a citation for the following statement that I found on Jist Archive Hub at https://archiveshub.jsc.ac.uk/data/gb206-ms1561 : In 1846 a group of schoolmasters in Brighton, concerned about professional standards, set up a Society of Teachers, which was incorporated by Royal Charter in 1849 and became the College of Preceptors. The statement was written on an un-numbered page headed “Papers of the College of Preceptors” and under the sub-heading of,“Administrative/Biographical History”.

Citing information gleaned from a page by page search or examination of a large record set

How do you create a citation when the entire record or collection of records is your reference? For instance, an unpaginated diary mentions a farm hand named Hank in at least 26 entries spanning five years. If I use this as evidence that Hank was a farmhand for the diarist in that time span, do I need to list every individual entry that mentions Hank or is it enough to include a date range?

Book- Town Records

Good evening.

I'm a  little stumped on how to cite this book. I am mostly stuck I think, on the author/publisher portion. It's available at several online venues but to confuse matters, everywhere I look there are slight differences in how it is cataloged, especially when it comes to the author and publisher.

Document categories questions

Sorry this is so long. After reading thru some of the QuickLesson's and searching the forum, I realize I may be doing some of my citations incorrectly.

Census - I have been citing the census year, state, county, page, person(s), repository as FamilySearch. From my reading I should also be citing the database at FamilySearch not just them as a repository? The same for other documents (i.e. marriage record, wills, deeds, etc) obtained from FamilySearch?

Online database marriage records

I am a bit confused...I have created two different citations for a marriage record that was found on Family Search and I am not sure which one is correct.

Allen County, Indiana, Marriage Records, vol. 86:201, Alfred Richard Lueders-Martha Katherine Belschner, 4 January 1936; "Indiana Marriages, 1811-2019", Family Search (www.familysearch.com : accessed 19 May 2020), image 106 of 311; citing Indiana Commission on Public Records, Indianapolis, Indiana, imaged from FHL microfilm 004201537

Citing Multiple Creators

I have a need to cite creators who have different roles for the same source, but I cannot see an example. My specific case involves an author and a separate translator, both of whom I wish to cite as they both contribute to the work being analysed, but I'll try to keep the question general.

My issue is with the punctuation. The role is normally separated from the creator name with a comma, but commas might also be used when there are multiple authors. Hence, how do form an unambiguous list of creators that may have differing roles?

Sourcing a human transcription of a vital certificate when the certificate itself cannot be viewed online?

Cook County, Illinois vital certificates are a decent example of what I'm inquiring about.  On a standard database with images for genealogical research, the images of these certificates are are not made available to the researcher.  However, human transcriptions of them are available on these websites (websites like FamilySearch, Ancestry etc.).

Seeking pointers on how to build a full reference note for these types of transcriptions.  My only copy of EE is 3rd edition revised.  Thanks so much in advance!

Sesquicentennial resolution

I want to cite a state resolution in honor of a town's sesquicentennial anniversary. I used the slip law example in 13.17 as my base, but unlike in the example, the resolution itself doesn't have a descriptive name, so I used the name as published on the bill and added description at the back end to explain what people were looking at. Is that a good idea or superfluous?

I also added a url to find the resolution online. To use the search box, the printer's no. and year are helpful, so I went with those rather than the full resolution date cited in the example.