Additonal Layer, or new citation

 
 
 
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Raul_G
Raul_G's picture
Additonal Layer, or new citation

I recently found a reference on Ancestry to a marriage record I have difficulty finding.  It was a database, and with the information provided, I was able to contact the county clerk's office and quickly received an email copy with the information provide.  I think what is important was that I had previously contacted the county clerk's office directly and they had performed a search for me that came up negative. But once I had the Ancestry information, mispellings and all, they were able to find the record almost immediately.

With that, I wrote a citation using the information provided by Ancestry to include the original data (which seems scarce) and stated I subsequently was able to get my copy due to the information provided in the database.  I added that as information in an additional line. I think it is important as a search with "what we know", turns up negative. 

Or should I have an entirely new source for the email correspondence and record copy?  Here is my citiaton.

"Texas, Select County Marriage Records, 1837-2015," database,  Ancestry  (www.Ancestry.com; accessed 26 Sep 2017) referencing marriage of Guadelupe [Guadalupe] Gonzales and Raquel Tarrias [Farias] on 9 Oct 1926 licensed date 14 Oct 1926, document number 19260542; citing Cameron County, Texas Marriage Records, Cameron County Clerk's office, Brownsville, Texas.  Copy of record received via email 27 Sep 2017 from Vital Statistics Supervisor, Cameron County Clerk's Office, when above information provided. I appreciate your feedback. Raul

EE
EE's picture

Raul, you have indeed used two sources.  One is Ancestry's database, which is a derivative source created by Ancestry.  You also have an image copy provided by the courthouse. (I'm presuming it to be an image copy, though you first-referenced it as an "email copy" which could be (a) either an email that abstracts details from the record or (b) an email with an image attached.)  Grouping the two into one citation in which you explain the connection between the two is appropriate.

When you cite the second source, for fuller details you might follow one of the email models in EE's chapter 3 That would add the name of the person who supplied the record and the email address for future reference. Also, when we cite a courthouse office, we should include the town or city in which the courthouse stands. Some counties across the country have multiple courthouses.

The Editor

Raul_G
Raul_G's picture

Thank you for your response.  I consulted the chapter and section you referenced, plus the Quick check model.  I struggled a bit with the linking language, but came up with the citation below.  I get concerned where to get "wordy" in a citation.  

"Texas, Select County Marriage Records, 1837-2015," database,  Ancestry (www.Ancestry.com; accessed 26 Sep 2017) referencing marriage of Guadelupe [Guadalupe] Gonzales and Raquel Tarrias [Farias] on 9 Oct 1926 licensed date 14 Oct 1926, document number 19260542; citing Cameron County, Texas Marriage Records, Cameron County Clerk's office, Brownsville, Texas; image provided by Erika de la Torre, Vital Statistics Supervisor, Cameron County Clerk's office, Brownsville, TX [(E-ADDRESS) FOR PRIVATE USE,] to Gonzales Jr, Raul, e-mail with image copy when above information provided, 27 Sep 2017, privately held by Raul. Thank you,Raul

EE
EE's picture

Raul, the uncertainty you are feeling about "linking language" is happening because you're trying to create a link between two separate things that should not be linked.

Going back to your original effort, you recognized that you had used two different sources and you put them in different sentences. That instinct of yours was squarely on target. You had two different sources to cite. They can both be cited in the same reference note, but not in the same sentence.

Back in our school days, we were told that we could put multiple sources in the same citation sentence and use a semicolon to separate them. That worked fine then, because we were citing basic books and articles—simple stuff that had no internal semicolons to create confusion. However, when we cite complex sources that do have internal semicolons (like documents in an archive or citations to databases that also have to report what the database is citing) we do not put multiple sources in that one sentence. 

Using the details you cite in your last message, let's separate it all into its two parts. The citation to your first sources, the database, is in black (with occasional tweaking in red). The citation to your second source, the image you received by email, is in blue.

"Texas, Select County Marriage Records, 1837-2015," database,  Ancestry (www.Ancestry.com; accessed 26 Sep. 2017), entry for marriage of Guadelupe [Guadalupe] Gonzales and Raquel Tarrias [Farias]9 Oct. 1926 (license date 14 Oct. 1926), document number 19260542; citing Cameron County, Texas Marriage Records, Cameron County Clerk's office, Brownsville, Texas. Also, Erika de la Torre, Vital Statistics Supervisor, Cameron County Clerk's office, Brownsville, TX [(E-ADDRESS) FOR PRIVATE USE,] to Gonzales Jr, Raul, 27 Sept. 2017; privately held by Raul.

 

The Editor